25 - 28 August 2017
Festival 2017

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

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A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ba

&&&

Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 173

&&&

Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dan

&&&

Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Mu

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poet

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse o

&&&

Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half of the

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half of the concert, concertos and songs by Handel and French composers in Englan

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half of the concert, concertos and songs by Handel and French composers in England – including several of Huguenot heritage – are framed by two spectacular song and

&&&

Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half of the concert, concertos and songs by Handel and French composers in England – including several of Huguenot heritage – are framed by two spectacular song and dance numbers from the Restoration stage: the Passacaglia from Purcell’s semi-opera King Arthur (1691) and its model, the extended sung and danced Chaconne from Grabu’s French-style opera Albion and Albanius (1685).

Ricardo Barros and Barbara Segal join the regular team of SVF soloists, choir and orchestra in a special celebration of Baroque dance and music.

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unre

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half of the concert, concertos and songs by Handel and French composers in England – including several of Huguenot heritage – are framed by two spectacular song and dance numbers from the Restoration stage: the Passacaglia from Purcell’s semi-opera King Arthur (1691) and its model, the extended sung and danced Chaconne from Grabu’s French-style opera Albion and Albanius (1685).

Ricardo Barros and Barbara Segal join the regular team of SVF soloists, choir and orchestra in a special celebration of Baroque dance and music.

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved

&&&

Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half of the concert, concertos and songs by Handel and French composers in England – including several of Huguenot heritage – are framed by two spectacular song and dance numbers from the Restoration stage: the Passacaglia from Purcell’s semi-opera King Arthur (1691) and its model, the extended sung and danced Chaconne from Grabu’s French-style opera Albion and Albanius (1685).

Ricardo Barros and Barbara Segal join the regular team of SVF soloists, choir and orchestra in a special celebration of Baroque dance and music.

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
1 single £18 (reserved) ticket
plenty of £12 (unreserved) ticke

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Handel%%%Terpsicore (1734)!!!
%%%with music by Henry Purcell, Louis Grabu, James Paisible, Charles Dieupart, Peter Prelleur and John Ernest Galliard!!!

&&&

A fascinating programme exploring the influence of French music and dance in England. The main work is Handel’s rarely-performed Terpsicore, an unique fusion of French ballet and Italian opera written in 1734 as a vehicle for the charismatic dancer Maria Sallé. Apollo, Erato (the Muse of lyric poetry) and Terpsichore (the Muse of dancing) discuss love, with Terpsichore demonstrating aspects of passion from pleasure to jealousy in a sequence of beautiful French-style dances.

In the first half of the concert, concertos and songs by Handel and French composers in England – including several of Huguenot heritage – are framed by two spectacular song and dance numbers from the Restoration stage: the Passacaglia from Purcell’s semi-opera King Arthur (1691) and its model, the extended sung and danced Chaconne from Grabu’s French-style opera Albion and Albanius (1685).

Ricardo Barros and Barbara Segal join the regular team of SVF soloists, choir and orchestra in a special celebration of Baroque dance and music.

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
1 single £18 (reserved) ticket
plenty of £12 (unreserved) tickets

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Ni

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Nicolett

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Nicolette Moonen%%%!!!

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The Brazilian-Po

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Nicolette Moonen%%%!!!

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The Brazilian-Portuguese dancer and musician Ricardo Barros has an extraordinary ability to bring the v

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Nicolette Moonen%%%!!!

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The Brazilian-Portuguese dancer and musician Ricardo Barros has an extraordinary ability to bring the vanished world of Baroque dance vividly to life, drawing on his training as a harpsichordist and his research into dance as an expression of the passions in an equivalent to rhetorical speech. In this entertaining lecture demonstration he is joined by the violinist Nicolette Moonen and his fellow dancer Barbara Segal to explore how choreography interacted with music and how dance was an expression of the court culture of the period.

‘It was like watching old prints come to life’ Dance Europe

Sup

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Nicolette Moonen%%%!!!

&&&

The Brazilian-Portuguese dancer and musician Ricardo Barros has an extraordinary ability to bring the vanished world of Baroque dance vividly to life, drawing on his training as a harpsichordist and his research into dance as an expression of the passions in an equivalent to rhetorical speech. In this entertaining lecture demonstration he is joined by the violinist Nicolette Moonen and his fellow dancer Barbara Segal to explore how choreography interacted with music and how dance was an expression of the court culture of the period.

‘It was like watching old prints come to life’ Dance Europe

Supported

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Nicolette Moonen%%%!!!

&&&

The Brazilian-Portuguese dancer and musician Ricardo Barros has an extraordinary ability to bring the vanished world of Baroque dance vividly to life, drawing on his training as a harpsichordist and his research into dance as an expression of the passions in an equivalent to rhetorical speech. In this entertaining lecture demonstration he is joined by the violinist Nicolette Moonen and his fellow dancer Barbara Segal to explore how choreography interacted with music and how dance was an expression of the court culture of the period.

‘It was like watching old prints come to life’ Dance Europe

Supported by YouGov

Tickets: £15, £10; half-price for full-time students; under-18s FREE

current ticket availability: good availability at both pric

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a lecture demonstration with Barbara Segal and Nicolette Moonen%%%!!!

&&&

The Brazilian-Portuguese dancer and musician Ricardo Barros has an extraordinary ability to bring the vanished world of Baroque dance vividly to life, drawing on his training as a harpsichordist and his research into dance as an expression of the passions in an equivalent to rhetorical speech. In this entertaining lecture demonstration he is joined by the violinist Nicolette Moonen and his fellow dancer Barbara Segal to explore how choreography interacted with music and how dance was an expression of the court culture of the period.

‘It was like watching old prints come to life’ Dance Europe

Supported by YouGov

Tickets: £15, £10; half-price for full-time students; under-18s FREE

current ticket availability: good availability at both prices

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

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The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

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The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set pu

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

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The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication t

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

&&&

The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major qua

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

&&&

The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major quartet,

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

&&&

The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major quartet, ‘by virtue of its individuality, melodic invention and harmonic powe

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

&&&

The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major quartet, ‘by virtue of its individuality, melodic invention and harmonic power, is certain to win over every educated music lover’.

The Revolutionary Drawi

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

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The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major quartet, ‘by virtue of its individuality, melodic invention and harmonic power, is certain to win over every educated music lover’.

The Revolutionary Drawing Room is internationally renowned for its historically informed performances of music around 1800, with a sound founded on the beautiful sonority of gut strings.

‘a formidable quartet, whose virtuosity is matched by their insightful attention to every detail’ Early Music Review

‘the best kind of period performance, secure and undidactic’ Fanfare

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unre

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Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

&&&

The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major quartet, ‘by virtue of its individuality, melodic invention and harmonic power, is certain to win over every educated music lover’.

The Revolutionary Drawing Room is internationally renowned for its historically informed performances of music around 1800, with a sound founded on the beautiful sonority of gut strings.

‘a formidable quartet, whose virtuosity is matched by their insightful attention to every detail’ Early Music Review

‘the best kind of period performance, secure and undidactic’ Fanfare

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved

&&&

Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

&&&

The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major quartet, ‘by virtue of its individuality, melodic invention and harmonic power, is certain to win over every educated music lover’.

The Revolutionary Drawing Room is internationally renowned for its historically informed performances of music around 1800, with a sound founded on the beautiful sonority of gut strings.

‘a formidable quartet, whose virtuosity is matched by their insightful attention to every detail’ Early Music Review

‘the best kind of period performance, secure and undidactic’ Fanfare

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
only single £18 (reserved) seats
plenty of £12 (unreserved) sea

&&&

Haydn%%%Quartet in F minor Op. 20/5!!!
Mozart%%%Quartet in G major K387!!!
Beethoven%%%Quartet in C major Op. 59/3!!!

&&&

The string quartet was a prime musical vehicle for the feelings let loose by the political upheavals of the time – from intimate conversation to revolutionary turbulence and the contemplation of sublime nature. In this compelling programme ground-breaking quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are linked by their creative use of Baroque fugal techniques. Haydn’s op. 20, no. 5 is an early demonstration of the possibilities of the medium for serious musical thought, a challenge taken up by Mozart in his G major ‘Spring’ quartet K387, the first of the set published in 1783 with a dedication to Haydn. Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartets were thought impossibly difficult to understand when first performed in 1807, though a reviewer rightly wrote that the C major quartet, ‘by virtue of its individuality, melodic invention and harmonic power, is certain to win over every educated music lover’.

The Revolutionary Drawing Room is internationally renowned for its historically informed performances of music around 1800, with a sound founded on the beautiful sonority of gut strings.

‘a formidable quartet, whose virtuosity is matched by their insightful attention to every detail’ Early Music Review

‘the best kind of period performance, secure and undidactic’ Fanfare

Tickets: £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
only single £18 (reserved) seats
plenty of £12 (unreserved) seats

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favou

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden,

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subse

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

SVF

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

SVF favourite Philippa Hyde appears with Kate Semmens and Daniel Norman,

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

SVF favourite Philippa Hyde appears with Kate Semmens and Daniel Norman, who sang with her in The Coronation of Poppea last Festival. They are joined

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

SVF favourite Philippa Hyde appears with Kate Semmens and Daniel Norman, who sang with her in The Coronation of Poppea last Festival. They are joined by the exciting young countertenor James Hall, currently making a name for himself in concert and opera – including George Benjamin’s Written on Skin at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Richard Andrews contributes a narration conveying the essence of the play and teh historical implications.

Concert supported by donors to the Anthony King Memorial Fund.

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

SVF favourite Philippa Hyde appears with Kate Semmens and Daniel Norman, who sang with her in The Coronation of Poppea last Festival. They are joined by the exciting young countertenor James Hall, currently making a name for himself in concert and opera – including George Benjamin’s Written on Skin at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Richard Andrews contributes a narration conveying the essence of the play and teh historical implications.

Concert supported by donors to the Anthony King Memorial Fund.

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
ha

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Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

SVF favourite Philippa Hyde appears with Kate Semmens and Daniel Norman, who sang with her in The Coronation of Poppea last Festival. They are joined by the exciting young countertenor James Hall, currently making a name for himself in concert and opera – including George Benjamin’s Written on Skin at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Richard Andrews contributes a narration conveying the essence of the play and teh historical implications.

Concert supported by donors to the Anthony King Memorial Fund.

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
limited number of £20 (reserved) tickets
plenty of £14 (unreserved) ticke

&&&

&&&

Thomas Arne’s Alfred is universally known today for just one number, ‘Rule! Britannia’, performed every year at the Last Night of the Proms. However, the complete score contains some of Arne’s finest music and was one of his favourite works. It started life in 1740 as a short outdoor masque for Cliveden, the Thameside country house of Frederick, Prince of Wales. It was subsequently performed in the London theatres in expanded form as a masque, as an opera and as an oratorio. This performance is based on the full score Arne published in 1753.

SVF favourite Philippa Hyde appears with Kate Semmens and Daniel Norman, who sang with her in The Coronation of Poppea last Festival. They are joined by the exciting young countertenor James Hall, currently making a name for himself in concert and opera – including George Benjamin’s Written on Skin at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Richard Andrews contributes a narration conveying the essence of the play and teh historical implications.

Concert supported by donors to the Anthony King Memorial Fund.

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
limited number of £20 (reserved) tickets
plenty of £14 (unreserved) tickets


Festival Season Ticket



 

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We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfami


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts publi


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instr


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, inclu


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
ha


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
limited number of £20 (reserved) tickets
plenty of £14 (unreserved) ticke


Festival Season Ticket



 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
limited number of £20 (reserved) tickets
plenty of £14 (unreserved) tickets

 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John J

 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins

 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, v

 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from

 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)

 

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&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
ha

 

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We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
limited number of £20 (reserved) tickets
plenty of £14 (unreserved) ticke

 

&&&

&&&

We continue our Monteverdi project with the ground-breaking and ever-popular 1610 Vespers – but with a difference. In his great collection of music for Vespers of the Blessed Virgin, published in Venice in 1610, Monteverdi seems to have brought together music written at various times for different groups. In his new version Peter Holman follows the practice of the time by making the collection suitable for particular circumstances: he replaces three of the psalms with unfamiliar but superb settings of the same texts published late in Monteverdi’s life and after his death, making the whole work more consistent in its vocal scoring and more suitable for a chamber choir accompanied by a period-instrument ensemble.

In this performance regular SVF soloists, including Claire Coleman and Daniel Auchincloss, are joined by Psalmody and the John Jenkins Consort, playing cornetts, sackbuts, recorders, Renaissance flutes, violins, bass violin, violone, theorbo and two organs. Among the wind players are students from Birmingham Conservatoire and the Royal College of Music, mentored by members of the distinguished cornett and sackbut group QuintEssential.

Concert supported by YouGov and donors to The Monteverdi Project Fund

Tickets: £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
half-price for full-time students

current ticket availability:
limited number of £20 (reserved) tickets
plenty of £14 (unreserved) tickets

St Mary's Church, Stoke by Nayland Friday 25 August 2017
MONTEVERDI VESPERS OF 1610 – AND BEYOND 8 pm
Claire Coleman soprano, Daniel Auchincloss tenor, Psalmody, The John Jenkins Consort, directed by Peter Holman
Ticket options
Festival Season Ticket
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Polstead Village Hall Saturday 26 August 2017
EARLY BRASS MUSIC ON MODERN INSTRUMENTS 10 am
Sam Goble and Philip Dale of QuintEssential  
United Reformed Church, Hadleigh  
ENGLISH EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY MUSIC: WHY IT MATTERS 5:15 pm
Professor Peter Holman  
St Mary's Church, Hadleigh  
THOMAS ARNE: ALFRED 6:30 pm
Philippa Hyde soprano, Kate Semmens soprano, James Hall countertenor, Daniel Norman tenor, Richard Andrews narrator, Essex Baroque Orchestra, directed by Steven Devine
Ticket options
 
St Mary's Church, Boxford Sunday 27 August 2017
‘IN A NEW AND SPECIAL MANNER’: THE CLASSICAL STRING QUARTET 5:15 pm
Professor Julian Rushton  
St Mary's Church, Boxford  
THE REVOLUTIONARY DRAWING ROOM 6:30 pm
Adrian Butterfield violin, Kathryn Parry violin, Rachel Stott viola, Ruth Alford violoncello
Ticket options
 
St Peter's, Sudbury Monday 28 August 2017
RICARDO BARROS: BAROQUE DANCE 11 am
Ricardo Barross dancer, Barbara Segal dancer, Nicolette Moonen violin
Ticket options
 
Gainsborough's House  
SUDBURY, SILK AND THE HUGUENOT HERITAGE 2 pm
Liz Trenow, Richard Humphries  
St Peter's, Sudbury  
HANDEL AND THE HUGUENOTS: FRENCH DANCE & MUSIC IN ENGLAND 6:30 pm
Ricardo Barros dancer, Barbara Segal dancer, Philippa Hyde soprano, Claire Coleman soprano, Psalmody, Essex Baroque Orchestra, directed by Peter Holman
Ticket options