26 - 29 August 2016
Festival 2016

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The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

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The first half of the

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The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

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The first half of the concert is a co

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The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

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The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th annive

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The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

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The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by T

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The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

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The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas

&&&

The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and

&&&

The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and Henry Bishop’s once famous song ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’, written for A Co

&&&

The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and Henry Bishop’s once famous song ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’, written for A Comedy of Errors in 1819.  Mendelssohn’s beautifully orchestrated Wedding March, written in 1843 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, provides a rousing conclusion.

Mozart left his Requiem unfinished when he died on 5 December, 1791 and soon after his widow asked Franz Xaver Süssmayr to complete it.  This version is the one normally heard today, though Richard Maunder has tried to produce something closer to Moz

&&&

The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and Henry Bishop’s once famous song ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’, written for A Comedy of Errors in 1819.  Mendelssohn’s beautifully orchestrated Wedding March, written in 1843 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, provides a rousing conclusion.

Mozart left his Requiem unfinished when he died on 5 December, 1791 and soon after his widow asked Franz Xaver Süssmayr to complete it.  This version is the one normally heard today, though Richard Maunder has tried to produce something closer to Mozart’s late style, rejecting Süssmayr’s inadequate additions and orchestrating it using

&&&

The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and Henry Bishop’s once famous song ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’, written for A Comedy of Errors in 1819.  Mendelssohn’s beautifully orchestrated Wedding March, written in 1843 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, provides a rousing conclusion.

Mozart left his Requiem unfinished when he died on 5 December, 1791 and soon after his widow asked Franz Xaver Süssmayr to complete it.  This version is the one normally heard today, though Richard Maunder has tried to produce something closer to Mozart’s late style, rejecting Süssmayr’s inadequate additions and orchestrating it using Die Zauberflöte
and La Clemenza di Tito as models.  The result is

&&&

The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and Henry Bishop’s once famous song ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’, written for A Comedy of Errors in 1819.  Mendelssohn’s beautifully orchestrated Wedding March, written in 1843 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, provides a rousing conclusion.

Mozart left his Requiem unfinished when he died on 5 December, 1791 and soon after his widow asked Franz Xaver Süssmayr to complete it.  This version is the one normally heard today, though Richard Maunder has tried to produce something closer to Mozart’s late style, rejecting Süssmayr’s inadequate additions and orchestrating it using Die Zauberflöte
and La Clemenza di Tito as models.  The result is a fas

&&&

The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and Henry Bishop’s once famous song ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’, written for A Comedy of Errors in 1819.  Mendelssohn’s beautifully orchestrated Wedding March, written in 1843 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, provides a rousing conclusion.

Mozart left his Requiem unfinished when he died on 5 December, 1791 and soon after his widow asked Franz Xaver Süssmayr to complete it.  This version is the one normally heard today, though Richard Maunder has tried to produce something closer to Mozart’s late style, rejecting Süssmayr’s inadequate additions and orchestrating it using Die Zauberflöte
and La Clemenza di Tito as models.  The result is a fascinating new insight into a familiar masterpiece.

Tickets £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
Half-price tickets available to full-time studen

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The Classical Bard – Shakespearean music by Arne, Linley, Storace, Bishop & Mendelssohn%%%!!!
Mozart%%%Requiem in D minor K626 (reconstructed by Richard Maunder)!!!

&&&

The first half of the concert is a contribution to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, exploring music written for his plays in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It includes music for The Tempest by Thomas Arne and Thomas Linley, including Linley’s great storm chorus, and Henry Bishop’s once famous song ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’, written for A Comedy of Errors in 1819.  Mendelssohn’s beautifully orchestrated Wedding March, written in 1843 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, provides a rousing conclusion.

Mozart left his Requiem unfinished when he died on 5 December, 1791 and soon after his widow asked Franz Xaver Süssmayr to complete it.  This version is the one normally heard today, though Richard Maunder has tried to produce something closer to Mozart’s late style, rejecting Süssmayr’s inadequate additions and orchestrating it using Die Zauberflöte
and La Clemenza di Tito as models.  The result is a fascinating new insight into a familiar masterpiece.

Tickets £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
Half-price tickets available to full-time students


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A lecture recital for young people of all ag

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A lecture recital for young people of all ages%%%!!!

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A lecture recital for young people of all ages%%%!!!

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This entertaining lecture recital on double-reed instruments brings the sound world of the courts and cities of Europe vividly alive, from the thrilling sound of the Mediaeval alta capella and the dance music of the Renaissance waits bands to the

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A lecture recital for young people of all ages%%%!!!

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This entertaining lecture recital on double-reed instruments brings the sound world of the courts and cities of Europe vividly alive, from the thrilling sound of the Mediaeval alta capella and the dance music of the Renaissance waits bands to the polished and sophisticated repertoire of the Enlightment oboe bands. Music by Landini, Machaut, Josquin, Praetorius, Purcell, Telemann and others. Suitable for young people of all ages.

Syrinx performs wind music from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries on historical instruments. Its members play in many of the world’s leading period instrument orchestras and chamber groups, and the group recently made its CD debut with The Saxon Alternative, a collection of Telemann’s wind ensemble music.

‘…endless pleasure in rarely heard

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A lecture recital for young people of all ages%%%!!!

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This entertaining lecture recital on double-reed instruments brings the sound world of the courts and cities of Europe vividly alive, from the thrilling sound of the Mediaeval alta capella and the dance music of the Renaissance waits bands to the polished and sophisticated repertoire of the Enlightment oboe bands. Music by Landini, Machaut, Josquin, Praetorius, Purcell, Telemann and others. Suitable for young people of all ages.

Syrinx performs wind music from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries on historical instruments. Its members play in many of the world’s leading period instrument orchestras and chamber groups, and the group recently made its CD debut with The Saxon Alternative, a collection of Telemann’s wind ensemble music.

‘…endless pleasure in rarely heard pieces’  The Sunday Times

Tickets £15 (reserved), £10 (unreserved)
Half-price tickets available to full-time students
Under-18s FREE



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Kapsberger & de Visée%%%!!!

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Fred Jacobs is one of the world’s most distinguished lutenists, and he makes a welcome return to the Festival as a member of the continuo team in The Coronation of Poppea and in this solo recital, pairing two of the greatest seventeenth-century composers for the theorbo, the largest and most sonorous member of the lute family, with an extended neck, two sets of strings and two peg-boxes.

In his 2013 SVF recital Fred astonished us with the lute music of the Roman composer Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (c.1580-1651), and now he plays a selection of his equally remarkable theorbo music, full of the expressive and virtuosic writing we associate with the

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Kapsberger & de Visée%%%!!!

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Fred Jacobs is one of the world’s most distinguished lutenists, and he makes a welcome return to the Festival as a member of the continuo team in The Coronation of Poppea and in this solo recital, pairing two of the greatest seventeenth-century composers for the theorbo, the largest and most sonorous member of the lute family, with an extended neck, two sets of strings and two peg-boxes.

In his 2013 SVF recital Fred astonished us with the lute music of the Roman composer Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (c.1580-1651), and now he plays a selection of his equally remarkable theorbo music, full of the expressive and virtuosic writing we associate with the world of Monteverdi. Robert de Visée was the greatest exponent of the theorbo in Louis XIV’s France, a member of the select group that provided private concerts for the king at Versailles.  Fred plays a selection from de Visée’s piéces de theorbo, including delightful arrangements of pieces by Lully and François Couperin and the ‘Allemande La Royalle’, said to be ‘aymé du roy’ – loved by the king.

‘Fred Jacobs’s playing is exquisite, drawing out the full range and depth of the plucked sounds, conjuring up a vanishe

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Kapsberger & de Visée%%%!!!

&&&

Fred Jacobs is one of the world’s most distinguished lutenists, and he makes a welcome return to the Festival as a member of the continuo team in The Coronation of Poppea and in this solo recital, pairing two of the greatest seventeenth-century composers for the theorbo, the largest and most sonorous member of the lute family, with an extended neck, two sets of strings and two peg-boxes.

In his 2013 SVF recital Fred astonished us with the lute music of the Roman composer Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (c.1580-1651), and now he plays a selection of his equally remarkable theorbo music, full of the expressive and virtuosic writing we associate with the world of Monteverdi. Robert de Visée was the greatest exponent of the theorbo in Louis XIV’s France, a member of the select group that provided private concerts for the king at Versailles.  Fred plays a selection from de Visée’s piéces de theorbo, including delightful arrangements of pieces by Lully and François Couperin and the ‘Allemande La Royalle’, said to be ‘aymé du roy’ – loved by the king.

‘Fred Jacobs’s playing is exquisite, drawing out the full range and depth of the plucked sounds, conjuring up a vanished world of intimacy and grandeur’  The Guardian

Tickets £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved)
Half-price tickets available to full-time students



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Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Fr

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Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing editio

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Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performa

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Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

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Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

&&&

We begin The Monteverdi Project, our e

&&&

Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

&&&

We begin The Monteverdi Project, our extended cycle of performances of Monteverdi

&&&

Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

&&&

We begin The Monteverdi Project, our extended cycle of performances of Monteverdi’s major works, with his last masterpiece

&&&

Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

&&&

We begin The Monteverdi Project, our extended cycle of performances of Monteverdi’s major works, with his last masterpiece, written and performed in the

&&&

Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

&&&

We begin The Monteverdi Project, our extended cycle of performances of Monteverdi’s major works, with his last masterpiece, written and performed in the final year of his life.  Busenello’s libretto for The Coronation of Poppea is a compelling and surprisingly modern tale of love, betrayal and power politics in the R

&&&

Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

&&&

We begin The Monteverdi Project, our extended cycle of performances of Monteverdi’s major works, with his last masterpiece, written and performed in the final year of his life.  Busenello’s libretto for The Coronation of Poppea is a compelling and surprisingly modern tale of love, betrayal and power politics in the Rome of the emperor Nero. Monteverdi’s superb music, continually slipping between speech-like recitative and lyrical arias, confronts us with the human predicament through the emotions and actions of his all-too-fallible protagonists.

The large cast brings together regular SVF soloists, including Philippa Hyde, Claire Coleman (Tomlin), Emma Bishton and Giles Davies, with distinguished visitors Nicholas Sales and Daniel Norman, well known for their appearances with Welsh National Opera, English National Opera, Opera North, Covent Garden and other companies

&&&

Monteverdi%%%The Coronation of Poppea (1643)!!!
%%%libretto by Giovanni Francesco Busenello!!!
%%%performing edition by Peter Holman!!!
%%%concert performance sung in Italian!!!

&&&

We begin The Monteverdi Project, our extended cycle of performances of Monteverdi’s major works, with his last masterpiece, written and performed in the final year of his life.  Busenello’s libretto for The Coronation of Poppea is a compelling and surprisingly modern tale of love, betrayal and power politics in the Rome of the emperor Nero. Monteverdi’s superb music, continually slipping between speech-like recitative and lyrical arias, confronts us with the human predicament through the emotions and actions of his all-too-fallible protagonists.

The large cast brings together regular SVF soloists, including Philippa Hyde, Claire Coleman (Tomlin), Emma Bishton and Giles Davies, with distinguished visitors Nicholas Sales and Daniel Norman, well known for their appearances with Welsh National Opera, English National Opera, Opera North, Covent Garden and other companies here and abroad.

Tickets £20 (reserved), £14 (unreserved)
Half-price tickets available to full-time students

The concert is due to end at 9.30pm



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Mozart%%%Serenade no 10 in B flat K361!!!
Haydn%%%Concerto in F for violin & harpsichord!!!
Mozart%%%Symphony no. 25 in G minor K183!!!

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The Gran Partita, misleadingly known as the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments (despite being written for 12 winds and double bass) is one of Mozart’s greatest works, written in 1781

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Mozart%%%Serenade no 10 in B flat K361!!!
Haydn%%%Concerto in F for violin & harpsichord!!!
Mozart%%%Symphony no. 25 in G minor K183!!!

&&&

The Gran Partita, misleadingly known as the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments (despite being written for 12 winds and double bass) is one of Mozart’s greatest works, written in 1781 at the height of his powers.  It is l

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Mozart%%%Serenade no 10 in B flat K361!!!
Haydn%%%Concerto in F for violin & harpsichord!!!
Mozart%%%Symphony no. 25 in G minor K183!!!

&&&

The Gran Partita, misleadingly known as the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments (despite being written for 12 winds and double bass) is one of Mozart’s greatest works, written in 1781 at the height of his powers.  It is laid out on the largest scale, in seven mo

&&&

Mozart%%%Serenade no 10 in B flat K361!!!
Haydn%%%Concerto in F for violin & harpsichord!!!
Mozart%%%Symphony no. 25 in G minor K183!!!

&&&

The Gran Partita, misleadingly known as the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments (despite being written for 12 winds and double bass) is one of Mozart’s greatest works, written in 1781 at the height of his powers.  It is laid out on the largest scale, in seven movements, with the richest

&&&

Mozart%%%Serenade no 10 in B flat K361!!!
Haydn%%%Concerto in F for violin & harpsichord!!!
Mozart%%%Symphony no. 25 in G minor K183!!!

&&&

The Gran Partita, misleadingly known as the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments (despite being written for 12 winds and double bass) is one of Mozart’s greatest works, written in 1781 at the height of his powers.  It is laid out on the largest scale, in seven movements, with the richest harmonie scoring: 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 basset horns, 4 horns, 2 bassoons and bass. Not for nothing did Peter Shaffer make Salieri exclaim in Amadeus that he heard ‘t

&&&

Mozart%%%Serenade no 10 in B flat K361!!!
Haydn%%%Concerto in F for violin & harpsichord!!!
Mozart%%%Symphony no. 25 in G minor K183!!!

&&&

The Gran Partita, misleadingly known as the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments (despite being written for 12 winds and double bass) is one of Mozart’s greatest works, written in 1781 at the height of his powers.  It is laid out on the largest scale, in seven movements, with the richest harmonie scoring: 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 basset horns, 4 horns, 2 bassoons and bass. Not for nothing did Peter Shaffer make Salieri exclaim in Amadeus that he heard ‘the voice of God’ in the sublime Adagio.  Live performances of the work are understandably rare, and this one has been made possible by our Mozart Wind Project educational initiative, which pairs students studying Classical wind instruments with the members of Syrinx, our 2016 ensemble in residence.

The presence of four horns in the Serenade enables us to include Mozart’s tempestuous and richly scored Symphony no. 25 in G minor (1773), an astonishing achievement for a seventeen year old. The programme is completed by Haydn’s fine but rarely perform

&&&

Mozart%%%Serenade no 10 in B flat K361!!!
Haydn%%%Concerto in F for violin & harpsichord!!!
Mozart%%%Symphony no. 25 in G minor K183!!!

&&&

The Gran Partita, misleadingly known as the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments (despite being written for 12 winds and double bass) is one of Mozart’s greatest works, written in 1781 at the height of his powers.  It is laid out on the largest scale, in seven movements, with the richest harmonie scoring: 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 basset horns, 4 horns, 2 bassoons and bass. Not for nothing did Peter Shaffer make Salieri exclaim in Amadeus that he heard ‘the voice of God’ in the sublime Adagio.  Live performances of the work are understandably rare, and this one has been made possible by our Mozart Wind Project educational initiative, which pairs students studying Classical wind instruments with the members of Syrinx, our 2016 ensemble in residence.

The presence of four horns in the Serenade enables us to include Mozart’s tempestuous and richly scored Symphony no. 25 in G minor (1773), an astonishing achievement for a seventeen year old. The programme is completed by Haydn’s fine but rarely performed Concerto in F major for violin, harpsichord and strings.

Tickets £18 (reserved), £12 (unreserved)
Half-price tickets available to full-time students


St Mary's Church, Stoke by Nayland Friday 26 August 2016
GRAN PARTITA 8 pm
Syrinx and Friends, Tassilo Erhardt violin, Steven Devine harpsichord, Essex Baroque Orchestra, directed by Steven Devine
Ticket options
 
United Reformed Church, Hadleigh Saturday 27 August 2016
Who do they think they are? The characters in Poppea 5:15 pm
Professor Richard Andrews  
St Mary's Church, Hadleigh  
MONTEVERDI THE CORONATION OF POPPEA 6:30 pm
Poppea: Philippa Hyde soprano, Nerone: Claire Coleman soprano, Ottavia: Kate Semmens soprano, Drusilla: Emma Bishton soprano, Ottone: Nicholas Sales tenor, Arnalta: Daniel Norman tenor, Seneca: Giles Davies bass, The John Jenkins Consort, directed by Peter Holman
Ticket options
 
St James's Church, Nayland Sunday 28 August 2016
An Engine of War? The Theorbo in History and Practice 5:15 pm
Michael Lowe  
St James's Church, Nayland  
MASTERS OF THE THEORBO 6:30 pm
Fred Jacobs theorbo
Ticket options
 
St Mary's Church, Boxford Monday 29 August 2016
A BLAST FROM THE PAST 11 am
Syrinx: Ann Allen, Belinda Paul, Gail Hennessy and Sally Holman playing bagpipes, shawms, dulcians, Deutsche schalmei, oboes and bassoon
Ticket options
 
Gainsborough's House  
Reconstructing Mozart’s Requiem 5:15 pm
Richard Maunder  
St Peter's, Sudbury  
THE CLASSICAL BARD & MOZART REQUIEM 6:30 pm
Philippa Hyde soprano, Psalmody, Essex Baroque Orchestra, directed by Peter Holman
Ticket options
Pre-concert talk? SOLD OUT